Physiotherapy and Allied Health

{
  "moduleName": "tag_postlist_0",
  "id": 665456,
  "type": "BlogsPosts",
  "date": "2015-09-23T00:00:00",
  "author": "Matt Cooper",
  "authorBiography": "",
  "authorPictureUrl": "/CatalystImages/UserProfileDefault.jpg",
  "trackbackUrl": "http://www.ethoshealth.com.au/BlogRetrieve.aspx?BlogID=14726&PostID=665456&A=Trackback",
  "url": "/blog1/attitude-and-ageing",
  "title": "Attitude and Ageing",
  "postFeaturedImage": "/Images/blog/Laughing-ladies.png",
  "metaTitle": "Attitude and Ageing",
  "metaDescription": "Stereotypes of ageing are common and are usually not complimentary. But who cares about them anyway…? Unless they affect our behaviour.",
  "body": "

\n

Stereotypes of ageing are common and are usually not complimentary. But who cares about them anyway…? Unless they affect our behaviour.

\n

STEREOTYPES OF OLDER PEOPLE

\n

If I were to ask you which group of people these terms are often used to describe, I'm sure it would not take you long to arrive at ''older'' people.\n Forgetful. Slow. Inactive. Inflexible. Technophobic. Prone to illness. Unable to learn new things. Bad drivers. Vulnerable. Grumpy. Isolated. Lonely.\n
\n

\n

These terms, so often used to describe ''older'' people, tells you they are stereotypes. Stereotypes are sweeping generalisations applied to an entire\n group of people and, in this case, they are most definitely destructive.

\n

Yet, think of the ''older'' people you know, and you will most likely come to realise that most, if not all, of these terms do not apply to them. Then\n ask yourself what ''older'' actually means and, depending on your age, you will probably realise it is a matter of perspective.

\n

A 2013 report by the Australian Human Rights Commission illustrated that our perceptions of the terms ''old'' and ''elderly'' move to older age-groups\n the older we get - that the younger people are, the younger they perceive the age threshold of ''old'' and ''elderly'' to be. It finds that the\n concept of ''ageing'' carries predominantly negative connotations and many Australians believe in a number of stereotypes about older people. People\n aged 18-24 are most likely to see them as ''sick'', ''having difficulty learning complex tasks or new things'' and ''not caring about their appearances''.

\n

But negative stereotypes lead to negative behaviours. More than a third of Australians aged 55 to 64 reported age-related discrimination such as being\n ignored, joked about or turned down for a job, and many cast themselves as worthless, sad, angry or useless. Negative stereotypes are self-fulfilling;\n they generate the infirmity upon which they are falsely premised.

\n

This means negative stereotypes have an impact beyond psychology and actually have the potential to influence length as well as quality of life. A\n study published in February this year tracked the fortunes over 8 years of thousands of older people who were asked the simple question: ‘How old\n do you feel you are?’. Those who felt older than their chronological age had a 41% higher chance of dying than those who felt younger, even adjusting\n for people with illnesses.

\n

HOW COULD FEELING OLD BE A HEALTH HAZARD?

\n

People with negative expectations about ageing limit their behaviour. When you expect things to go downhill, you don’t invest in strategies that could\n make you better.

\n

WANT MORE PROOF SHOWING THE LINK BETWEEN ATTITUDE AND AGEING?

\n

In 1979, Harvard psychology profession Ellen Langer recruited older men for a study that packed them off for a week in the country with a twist; their\n retreat was retrofitted with ‘50s paraphernalia and the house role was that they wer back in the year 1959. That meant debating current political\n issues of the time, listening to music of the time. The men seemed to miraculously wind back their age, making gains in flexibility, dexterity\n and even appearance.\n
So much so, that in 2010, the BBC set up a similar house but made it a 1970s house for a group of ageing legends. The same thing happened. Physical\n and mental health improved and so did independence.

\n

If we believe we can do something, it has a powerful effect on our behaviour.\n
A negative attitude or expectation to our health, no matter our age, limits our ability and willingness to undertake positive lifestyle behaviours.

\n

Source: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/being-old-is-not-wearisome-it-is-being-stereotyped-20130620-2olpq.html

\n

", "urlWithHost": "http://www.ethoshealth.com.au/blog1/attitude-and-ageing", "rating": 0.0, "commentsCount": 0, "trackbacksCount": 0, "globals": { "get": { "PostID": "665456" }, "cookie": { "visitorDeviceClass": "desktop", "ASP.NET_SessionId": "djvgaddcul2crwllcryh4tbr", "ANONID_FS2573723": "20.01.2021 19:46:35.175", "ANONID2573723": "2d6ff08a-afe4-43df-ac96-0c2f9eec1d35", "VISID2573723": "e555e0a9-a755-4253-88ce-c7d4b15f6cb3#www.ethoshealth.com.au#20.01.2021 19:46:35.175" }, "site": { "id": 2573723, "name": "Ethos Health", "host": "www.ethoshealth.com.au", "countryCode": "AU", "language": "EN", "dateNow": "2021-01-21T06:46:35.175365" }, "visitor": { "deviceClass": "desktop", "ip": "18.215.185.97", "country": "US", "city": "Ashburn", "userAgent": "CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)", "referrer": "/" }, "cart": { "cartUrl": "/OrderRetrievev2.aspx?CatalogueID=0" }, "user": { "entityId": 0, "firstname": "", "middleName": "", "lastname": "", "fullname": "", "username": "", "email": "", "email2": "", "email3": "", "customerType": {}, "leadSourceType": {}, "industryType": {}, "ratingType": {}, "isWholesaler": false, "isLoggedIn": false } }, "company": { "moduleName": "json", "moduleDescriptor": { "templatePath": null, "parameters": "json=\"/_System/apps/cbo-global-site-settings/_data/sitesettings.json\",collection=\"company\",template=\"/_System/apps/cbo-global-site-settings/_config/schema-json.tpl\"", "apiEndpoint": "/api/v3/json", "objectType": -1, "objectId": -1, "adminUrl": "" }, "DashboardID": "1454144973301501480", "CompanyName": "Ethos Health", "CompanySlogan": "", "CompanyLogoURL": "/Images/logo.png", "CompanyDomain": "www.ethoshealth.com.au", "LocName1": "Newcastle Practice", "Loc1Addr1": "8 Denison Street", "Loc1Addr2": "", "Loc1City": "Newcastle West", "Loc1State": " NSW", "Loc1PostCode": "2302", "Loc1Country": "", "Loc1Phone": "02 4962 8700", "Loc1Fax": "02 4962 8701", "Loc1Email": "enquiries@ethoshealth.com.au", "Loc1ContPrsn": "", "Loc1TimeZone": "10", "Loc1MonisOpen": "true", "Loc1MonOpen": "0800", "Loc1MonClose": "1900", "Loc1SatisOpen": "false", "Loc1SatOpen": "0030", "Loc1SatClose": "0030", "Loc1TueisOpen": "true", "Loc1TueOpen": "0800", "Loc1TueClose": "1900", "Loc1SunisOpen": "false", "Loc1SunOpen": "0030", "Loc1SunClose": "0030", "Loc1WedisOpen": "true", "Loc1WedOpen": "0800", "Loc1WedClose": "1900", "Loc1ThuisOpen": "true", "Loc1ThuOpen": "0800", "Loc1ThuClose": "1900", "Loc1FriisOpen": "true", "Loc1FriOpen": "0800", "Loc1FriClose": "1700", "LocName2": "Lake Macquarie Practice ", "Loc2Addr1": "Suite 5, Level 2", "Loc2Addr2": "6-8 Sydney Street", "Loc2City": "Gateshead", "Loc2State": "NSW", "Loc2PostCode": "2290", "Loc2Country": "", "Loc2Phone": "02 4962 8700", "Loc2Fax": "02 4962 8701", "Loc2Email": "", "Loc2ContPrsn": "", "Loc2TimeZone": "10", "Loc2MonisOpen": "true", "Loc2MonOpen": "0830", "Loc2MonClose": "1730", "Loc2SatisOpen": "false", "Loc2SatOpen": "0030", "Loc2SatClose": "0030", "Loc2TueisOpen": "true", "Loc2TueOpen": "0800", "Loc2TueClose": "1800", "Loc2SunisOpen": "false", "Loc2SunOpen": "0030", "Loc2SunClose": "0030", "Loc2WedisOpen": "true", "Loc2WedOpen": "0800", "Loc2WedClose": "1800", "Loc2ThuisOpen": "true", "Loc2ThuOpen": "0900", "Loc2ThuClose": "1700", "Loc2FriisOpen": "true", "Loc2FriOpen": "0800", "Loc2FriClose": "1700", "LocName3": "Brookvale ", "Loc3Addr1": "14/10-18 Orchard Rd ", "Loc3Addr2": "", "Loc3City": "Brookvale ", "Loc3State": "NSW", "Loc3PostCode": "2100", "Loc3Country": "", "Loc3Phone": "0499 222 618", "Loc3Fax": "", "Loc3Email": "", "Loc3ContPrsn": "", "Loc3TimeZone": "10", "Loc3MonisOpen": "false", "Loc3MonOpen": "0030", "Loc3MonClose": "0030", "Loc3SatisOpen": "false", "Loc3SatOpen": "0030", "Loc3SatClose": "0030", "Loc3TueisOpen": "false", "Loc3TueOpen": "0030", "Loc3TueClose": "0030", "Loc3SunisOpen": "false", "Loc3SunOpen": "0030", "Loc3SunClose": "0030", "Loc3WedisOpen": "false", "Loc3WedOpen": "0030", "Loc3WedClose": "0030", "Loc3ThuisOpen": "false", "Loc3ThuOpen": "0030", "Loc3ThuClose": "0030", "Loc3FriisOpen": "false", "Loc3FriOpen": "0030", "Loc3FriClose": "0030", "POBoxNo": "", "POBoxAddr": "", "POBoxCity": "", "POBoxState": "", "POBoxPostCode": "", "Facebook": "https://www.facebook.com/EthosHealth", "Twitter": "https://twitter.com/ethoshealth", "GooglePlus": "https://plus.google.com/100753322933562980966", "LinkedIn": "http://www.linkedin.com/company/2292396", "Instagram": "https://www.instagram.com/ethoshealth/", "Pinterest": "", "YouTube": "https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZmFGcnCtIzAIPWTNv1G4Mg", "SocialOther": "", "Custom1Label": "", "Custom1Value": "", "Custom2Label": "", "Custom2Value": "", "Custom3Label": "", "Custom3Value": "", "Custom4Label": "", "Custom4Value": "", "Custom5Label": "", "Custom5Value": "", "Custom6Label": "", "Custom6Value": "", "Custom7Label": "", "Custom7Value": "", "Custom8Label": "", "Custom8Value": "", "Custom9Label": "", "Custom9Value": "", "Custom10Label": "", "Custom10Value": "", "params": { "json": "/_System/apps/cbo-global-site-settings/_data/sitesettings.json", "collection": "company", "template": "/_System/apps/cbo-global-site-settings/_config/schema-json.tpl" } } }

Attitude and Ageing

by Ethos Health - 23 Sep 2015

Stereotypes of ageing are common and are usually not complimentary. But who cares about them anyway…? Unless they affect our behaviour.

STEREOTYPES OF OLDER PEOPLE

If I were to ask you which group of people these terms are often used to describe, I'm sure it would not take you long to arrive at ''older'' people. Forgetful. Slow. Inactive. Inflexible. Technophobic. Prone to illness. Unable to learn new things. Bad drivers. Vulnerable. Grumpy. Isolated. Lonely.

These terms, so often used to describe ''older'' people, tells you they are stereotypes. Stereotypes are sweeping generalisations applied to an entire group of people and, in this case, they are most definitely destructive.

Yet, think of the ''older'' people you know, and you will most likely come to realise that most, if not all, of these terms do not apply to them. Then ask yourself what ''older'' actually means and, depending on your age, you will probably realise it is a matter of perspective.

A 2013 report by the Australian Human Rights Commission illustrated that our perceptions of the terms ''old'' and ''elderly'' move to older age-groups the older we get - that the younger people are, the younger they perceive the age threshold of ''old'' and ''elderly'' to be. It finds that the concept of ''ageing'' carries predominantly negative connotations and many Australians believe in a number of stereotypes about older people. People aged 18-24 are most likely to see them as ''sick'', ''having difficulty learning complex tasks or new things'' and ''not caring about their appearances''.

But negative stereotypes lead to negative behaviours. More than a third of Australians aged 55 to 64 reported age-related discrimination such as being ignored, joked about or turned down for a job, and many cast themselves as worthless, sad, angry or useless. Negative stereotypes are self-fulfilling; they generate the infirmity upon which they are falsely premised.

This means negative stereotypes have an impact beyond psychology and actually have the potential to influence length as well as quality of life. A study published in February this year tracked the fortunes over 8 years of thousands of older people who were asked the simple question: ‘How old do you feel you are?’. Those who felt older than their chronological age had a 41% higher chance of dying than those who felt younger, even adjusting for people with illnesses.

HOW COULD FEELING OLD BE A HEALTH HAZARD?

People with negative expectations about ageing limit their behaviour. When you expect things to go downhill, you don’t invest in strategies that could make you better.

WANT MORE PROOF SHOWING THE LINK BETWEEN ATTITUDE AND AGEING?

In 1979, Harvard psychology profession Ellen Langer recruited older men for a study that packed them off for a week in the country with a twist; their retreat was retrofitted with ‘50s paraphernalia and the house role was that they wer back in the year 1959. That meant debating current political issues of the time, listening to music of the time. The men seemed to miraculously wind back their age, making gains in flexibility, dexterity and even appearance.
So much so, that in 2010, the BBC set up a similar house but made it a 1970s house for a group of ageing legends. The same thing happened. Physical and mental health improved and so did independence.

If we believe we can do something, it has a powerful effect on our behaviour.
A negative attitude or expectation to our health, no matter our age, limits our ability and willingness to undertake positive lifestyle behaviours.

Source: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/being-old-is-not-wearisome-it-is-being-stereotyped-20130620-2olpq.html

Ethos Health

Don't leave your health to chance. Be Better with access to:

  1. Health Tips and Tricks
  2. Educational Videos
  3. Awareness Initiatives
Click me for a modal
Prev URL:
Next Url:
Current Page: 1
Number of Pages: 1
Items per Page: 10
Total Items Count: 1